Ethnic political parties say junta’s UEC has no authority to impose new law on registration of political parties

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Yangon, November (22)

The powerful ethnic political parties have pointed out that the junta-appointed Union Election Commission (UEC) does not have the authority to enact a new law on the registration of political parties.

At a press conference of the military regime on November 18, UEC spokesperson U Khin Maung Oo stated that the Election Commission is making preparations to organize a free and fair general election and will soon enact a new law on the registration of political parties.

According to the new law, existing political parties will have to continue to follow the process in accordance with the law, and new political parties will be able to apply for party registration, U Khin Maung Oo said.

General Secretary of the Shan Nationalities League for Democracy (SNLD), Sai Laik, pointed out that the UEC has no authority to enforce this new law if it infringes any of the provisions of the 2008 Constitution.

According to U Tun Aung Kyaw, a member of the Arakan National Party’s central working committee, while the military council wields three powers at the same time, only the parliament has the authority to draft laws.

According to the Military Council, the junta-appointed Election Commission will timely update the election conditions, as well as the deadline for submitting candidates and election announcements.

The junta UEC stated that it will work with the Ministry of Home Affairs, the Ministry of Defense, and the authorities of regions and states since the security of the constituencies, the rule of law, peace, and stability are essential for holding elections.

There are currently more than 90 registered political parties. The National League for Democracy (NLD) has declared that it will not run in the general election to be held by the military council the following year, but the majority of the other parties have not made an official announcement regarding their participation.

The military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP) reshuffled its top positions in the run-up to the election in early October and has been holding frequent internal party meetings.

News-Than Lwin Times

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